My gardening book lists plants to grow on scree and dry walls. Does this mean no soil is required?

I have recently had my front garden landscaped, mostly shingle and groups of rocks. Very low maintenance but rather bare (my daughter calls it “Stonehenge”). I am considering ornamental grasses, but would like some colour and cover. I must admit I am not an enthusiast!

Related Items

3 Responses to “My gardening book lists plants to grow on scree and dry walls. Does this mean no soil is required?”

  1. Dogzilla said:

    You would be best to add some soil into the cracks before adding the plants. On old, established walls, the mortar and rock have deteriorated a little to make their own soil…..the seeds or spores just happen to land on that and can grow.

    Speed things up a bit and just stuff some soil into the crevices.

  2. Gardenclaire said:

    You’d have to scrape the shingle to one side, hack out some of the soil, scruffle up the hole so that the roots can get in there, then plant the chosen specimen into the hole with some nice potting compost or garden soil, firm it in, then push the gravel back so that the soil is covered.

    Shouldn’t be too hard, but yes, you will need soil! there is most probably soil under the hard landscaping, though there may be a membrane of some kind. If so you’ll need to cut a hole in it to plant through.

    Have fun. You never know – you might enjoy it!

  3. Toni f said:

    they need just enough soil to get them off and growing.




Message:

[newtagclound int=0]

Subscribe

Recent Comments

Recent Posts

Archives